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This assignment is a continuation of a previous assignment which is attached. Please review the previous assignment and complete this assignment based on the first. 
9-10 pgs. Not including reference and appendix. APA format. 10-15 new additional resources. Complete the assignment and complete the attached appendixes per each section. Some references have been provided attached. 
SWOT Analysis – Describe the organization’s internal strengths and weaknesses, its opportunities for growth and improvement, and the threats the external environment presents to its survival. (See Appendix C) 
Introduction– What is a SWOT Analysis  
SWOT Analysis – Presented in narrative format. Diagram placed in the appendix
Integrated discussion of the SWOT Analysis primary emergent themes you will focus on 60
Strengths 
Weaknesses 
Threats 
Opportunities 
The problem, Challenge, or Opportunity 
History of the problem – Emergence 
Past Attempts to solve the problem, challenge or address the opportunity 
Literature review (3 peer-reviewed articles) related to the specific problem, challenge, or opportunity
Solution & Vision for Change – Propose a theoretically or model-based solution for change within the context of factors or pressures that support the status quo (restraining forces) and those pressures that support change in the desired direction (driving forces). (See Appendix D and E)
Describe key elements of proposed change based on the literature review  
Discuss macro – theoretical/model basis of the proposed change (based on the literature review)
History of theory/model development 
Key proponents of theory/model
Seminal message/ focus of theory/model
Clear and thorough connection between the theory/model base and proposed change
Vision statement (Essential elements after the change – what will the difference look like?)
Systems, Roles, and Allies or Adversaries– Systems, Roles, and Allies or Adversaries Analysis Chart – Presented in narrative format. Diagram placed in appendix
Identify individuals and their organizational roles and if they are sponsor, agent, target and if they are allies or adversaries  
ID Force Field Analysis Chart – Presented in narrative format. Diagram placed in appendix 
Identify Internal Driving Force 
Identify Environmental Driving Force 
Identify Internal Restraining Force 
Identify Environmental Restraining Force 
Identify Benefits to target and if allies or adversaries 
Identify losses to target and if allies or adversaries 
Implementation Strategy – focus on the implementation plan for the change, including strategies arising from the force field analysis; and proposes an evaluation plan for ensuring the change is sustained. (See Appendix F)
Detailed, integrated discussion of change effort and the strategy for increasing the driving forces and diminishing the restraining forces; including all roles, benefits, losses, etc. 
Description of plan for enhancing driving forces 
Engaging allies in strategy 
Utilizing sponsor and agent (or others) in strategy 
Description of plan for influencing and containing resistant forces 
Engaging or minimizing adversaries in strategy 
Incorporation of benefits and losses to target group/others in strategy 
Evaluation Plan  
Introduction – Identify outcome. Specify timeline, target population,  
How will you measure outcomes
How will you use outcomes (plan for continuous assessment of change) 
Composition
Appendixes
References 

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Organizational Leadership Term Paper Brittany Lee April 10, 2022
OMSW 608 Organizational Policy & Leadership in Urban Human Service Programs Professor: Devron Dickens, LCSW-C

Running Head: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP TERM PAPER 1
Baltimore City Child Protective Services
Organization Structure
Baltimore City Department of Social Services (BCDSS) is a government agency. The local
and state government governs the agency. The revenue for the agency is from government funding
(federal, state, and local). The agency size is between 1000-5000 employees. It is a government
administration, the headquarters for the agency is in Baltimore. BCDSS is part of the Maryland
Department of Human Services (DHS). The agency provides vital services annually to more than
190,000 residents in Baltimore City. Its mission is to make Baltimore a place where people
independently support themselves and their families and where children and vulnerable adults are
safe from abuse and neglect. The main stakeholders of the agency are the children, the families,
the state, and the local government.
The current director of BCDSS is Brandi Stocksdale. Corine Mullings is the Deputy
Director for Adult and Child Welfare Services; Nikia Agent and Stephanie Popielski are the
Assistant Deputy Directors for Adult and Child Welfare Services and supervise multiple divisions.
There are various departments under Child welfare: CPS (Safety), extended hours, family
preservation, permanency, adoptions, and ready by 21.
Ms. Popielski supervises the program managers for CPS, extended hours, family
preservation, and adoptions. Taavon Bazemore is the program manager for CPS, which consists
of the screening and child protective services investigation units during regular business hours.
The caseworkers in the investigation units investigate child abuse reports and provide services to
children found to be neglected, physically, and/or sexually abused by their parents and/or family
members. Temitope Owoeye is the program manager for extended hours. Baltimore City CPS is
the only jurisdiction in Maryland that takes reports 24/7. Extended hours caseworkers do the initial

Running Head: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP TERM PAPER 2
screening and investigation outside of regular business hours. They begin work at 3 pm on the
weekdays and work till 7:30 am, and they work weekends and holidays. The program manager for
family preservation is Jennifer Berry. Family preservation assists families with case management
and other services to avoid placing children in foster care. The program manager for adoptions is
Terri Alston. Adoptions develop profiles on children in foster care who need adoptive resources.
Services are provided to relatives, foster parents, and fictive kin caretakers. Post-adoption
amenities may include a monthly subsidy, Medicaid/Medical Assistance, and information and
referral services.
Ms. Agent supervises the program managers for permanency and ready by 21. The program
manager for ready by 21 is Amesha Smith. Ready by 21 prepares youth for independence when
they turn twenty-one. Ready by 21 assists with attaining education or training programs; searching
and maintaining a job; creating a supportive network of family and friends; searching and
obtaining housing; education on managing finances; and getting access to affordable healthcare.
Willette Parrish-Harris and Teneill Wilson are both program managers for permanency.
Permanency, also known as foster care, offers assistance to children found CINA and placed in
licensed out-of-home living placements, including foster homes, group homes, and other
institutions. Permanency plans can be reunification with parents or legal guardians from whom the
children were removed, adoption or custody and guardianship to relatives, adoption by a non-
relative, or independence (for older children).
Under all program managers, there are Unit managers; under them are team administrators.
The number of team administrators varies in each department. Under the team administrators are
the caseworkers. Each team administrator can have up to at least 20 caseworkers. Turnovers
constantly occur within BCDSS, so someone can be in position for a day and be gone the next day.

Running Head: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP TERM PAPER 3
Social Problem – Lack of Out of Home Placement due to lack of resources
As of December 2021, there were 4,575 children in out-of-home placements (Out of home
placement: Total in Maryland, 2021). Out-of-Home (OOH) placement describes the situation of
children in the care and custody of the state for a variety of reasons. These may include a Child in
Need of Assistance (CINA), a Child in Need of Supervision (CINS), or a Delinquent. Children can
also enter OOH placement when a parent voluntarily places a child in the state’s care—for
example, when a child cannot access funding for necessary treatment without being in the state’s
care. Placement for children includes a family home (foster or kinship care), a community-based
residential facility (such as a residential child care program), a non-community-based residential
facility (such as a juvenile detention center or a residential treatment center), or a hospital.
The issue of child safety and welfare is relevant to social work. Due to the risk factors
children are exposed to, the community must ensure that they protect the rights and well-being of
children. Children are very vulnerable; hence there is a need for a very strong guide on the laws
and their strict enforcement. The laws should protect children from harm and enable social workers
to assess their needs and provide services accordingly (Rosen, 2020).
Child protective services (CPS) are driven by one goal: the assurance of kids from
additional abuse. Of the mediation choices that can be coordinated toward this objective, the
situation of a kid in substitute consideration is the most revolutionary in light of the expenses for
society and the troublesome life impacts on children and families. Both now and in the past, in any
case, the choice of position has been chosen now and again. The objective is to increase placement
and stability for children in foster care.
Local authorities can improve the system by providing both sets of parents (biological and
foster) to meet regularly and communicate issues regarding the children. In addition, authorities

Running Head: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP TERM PAPER 4
should ensure that biological parents have a satisfactory attachment to their children. However,
this should not be done at the expense of foster parents who provide facilities and resources to
ensure that children live normal lives. Authorities in the system should consider that homeless
children’s best interests are only met when all stakeholders are included in the process, which
would lead to inefficiency in this vital system.
The tools help the child agency find the proper placement that best suits the child’s needs.
The state and local governments need to be involved in achieving this goal. Regarding children in
foster care, the federal government required child welfare agencies to advance their procedures for
placing children in permanent homes.
Before a child can be legally adopted, they may have to wait for years. A child can lawfully
be adopted only after the court terminates the birth parent’s parental rights. Unless the child is
adopted by their foster parent(s) or relatives, they will remain in the foster care system. The finality
of adoption happens after the process of legal adoption is completed. Children need to experience
nurturing and stable environments during the early years of life because that is the time when they
learn to form relationships with primary caregivers.
Experiences such as neglect, abuse, and abandonment are critical in developing a child’s
brain and the ability to live effectively with other people. Research has established that children in
foster care experience high rates of physical, developmental, psychological, and mental health
problems than children who live with their parents. In addition, they have several unmet medical,
emotional, psychological, and mental health care needs. Children are placed under foster care to
protect them from physical harm that results from abuse, neglect, and abandonment. However, the
age at which many of them are enrolled is critical because it is characterized by high brain growth
and development (Barth, Courtney, Barrack, & Albert, 2017).

Running Head: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP TERM PAPER 5
The director of Child Welfare Services of BCDSS wants to make a meaningful and lasting
change in the lives of innocent victims of abuse and neglect. BCDSS is passionate about promoting
the safety and well-being of at-risk children and youth who require a safe home environment to
grow and thrive. The director oversees a dedicated group of social workers who screen Baltimore
City’s CPS hotline and investigations for children being abused and neglected. They demonstrate
strong leadership skills by ensuring all calls to the hotline are screened appropriately and are
assigned timely to the necessary CPS staff. They are committed to ensuring an equitable and fair
process of CPS findings for families by providing oversight for the appeals for CPS findings,
including working closely with legal services on the appeals process (Barth, Courtney, Barrack, &
Albert, 2017).
BCDSS’s Program Theory
A program theory is a logic that explains how and why a program is expected to work. It
links things that are supposed to be done and expected outcomes from actions taken. BCDSS’s
program theory is a program that is set to solve the issue of the safety of children in foster care.
The theory explains the activities and interventions involved in the program to achieve the set
objective, which is child safety in the state. Baltimore City Department of Social Services centers
around how to reinforce these associations and the job of the family’s and children’s commitment
at each stage.
Logic Model
There are a lot of children and adolescents who live in foster care. There are many reasons
for one to be admitted to foster care. The main issues to be addressed are the problems of children
placed in foster care, the social impact of foster care, whether these centers are run as they are
supposed, the effect of non-relative care on children, etc. Children in foster care sometimes feel

Running Head: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP TERM PAPER 6
like they are not getting the love and care from their biological parents. So, their mindset will be
different from children whose biological parents raised them. Children in families with violent or
neglective parents and guardians are more likely to develop psychiatric and behavioral problems
and have difficulty adjusting to normal environments. Often, children may become traumatized
and develop traumatic disorders from being in foster care (Mertens & Wilson, 2018).
Training is needed for the child care providers and the children. Training ensures the
families understand how to care for children suffering from trauma, so the children will not
undergo the same ordeal. Monitoring of the children will be included as needed. Adjustments to
the behavioral and interpersonal skills of the family members would significantly enhance the
relationships between the foster parent or caregiver and the children. This will help improve child
safety within the child welfare system. The goal would be to provide high-quality mental health
consultation to child care providers, families, and children to reduce the number of young children
involuntarily removed from their childcare setting.
Inputs: Due to their social/emotional development, there are a lot of children not entering
school in Baltimore City not ready to learn. Foster care providers require support to help children
with developmental issues and/or challenging behaviors. Due to their trauma, there are a lot of
children who do not stay in their foster care placements.
Activities: Establish partnership sites with specific child care providers. Establishing
partnerships will entail social workers conducting weekly visits, observing and assessing the
children who have behavioral problems, and creating individualized behavioral plans that will be
demonstrated to foster care providers. The progress of the child’s behavior will be monitored, and
referrals for other supports and services will be provided. Other activities include providing
consultation to other foster care providers as requested, collecting data, meeting weekly for

Running Head: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP TERM PAPER 7
supervision and support, providing care providers with training on behavioral and social-emotional
development, and establishing partnerships with other agencies.
These activities target children with emotional imbalance, poor social skills, behavior
problems, etc. The activities are aimed to train children on managing their emotions and how to
react when some scenarios occur. This therapy focuses on improving family relationships, and
hence conflicts in the families reduce. Adjustments will need to be made to behavioral and
interpersonal skills to enhance the relationships. Family-oriented cognitive behavior therapy
(CBT) is appropriate, and it has a significant effect in preventing children from being
retraumatized. CBT is a comprehensive and accurate treatment designed to address the problems
brought by both the guardians and the children. As a result, the family-oriented mechanism will
comprehensively address the complex issues affecting families. (Acri, Hamovitch, Gopalan, &
Lalayants, 2020).
Outputs: Children vulnerable to removal from their home and/or placement will be
supported. Children’s problematic social-emotional/behavioral issues will improve. Foster care
providers will establish increased skills in social-emotional and behavioral problems. Foster care
providers will be equipped with early intervention services and staff. Relationships between child
care professionals and families with young children are fostered.
Outcomes: Children in Baltimore City enter school ready to learn, are healthy, and feel
safe, as indicated by scores on a scale. A care system for young children is available, infusing
mental health services into child care settings. Foster care providers are more competent and
confident in addressing young children’s behavioral and developmental needs. Collaboration
amongst professionals interacting with children and families is enhanced.

Running Head: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP TERM PAPER 8
References
Acri, M. C., Hamovitch, E., Gopalan, G., & Lalayants, M. (2020). Examining a peer-delivered
program for child welfare-involved caregivers at risk for depression. Journal of Public
Child Welfare, 15(5), 565-582. https://doi.org/10.1080/15548732.2020.1760177
Barth, R. P., Courtney, M., Barrack, J. D., & Albert, V. (2017). Specialized foster care: A home
for children with special needs. From Child Abuse to Foster Care, 179-
194. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203791431-11
Barth, R. P., Courtney, M., Barrack, J. D., & Albert, V. (2017). Group care for children. From
Child Abuse to Foster Care, 221-234. https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203791431-13
Barth, R. P., Courtney, M. E., Barrack, J. D., & Albert, V. N. (2017). From child abuse to foster
care: Child welfare services pathways and placements. Routledge.
Frost, N. (Ed.). (2005). Child welfare: Major themes in health and Social Welfare. Routledge.
Mertens, D. M., & Wilson, A. T. (2018). Program evaluation theory and practice (2nd ed.). Gilford
Publications.
Rosen, M. (2020). Foster care. Treating Children in Out-of-Home Placements, 19-
36. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315786421-2
Tatienne, A. (2019). Child welfare services: Background, funding and foster care. Nova Snova.

https://doi.org/10.1080/15548732.2020.1760177
https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203791431-11
https://doi.org/10.4324/9780203791431-13
https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315786421-2

Running Head: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP TERM PAPER 9
Appendix A: Organizational Chart
Appendix B: Logic Model for Organizational Change

Running Head: ORGANIZATIONAL LEADERSHIP TERM PAPER 10
Identify the problem, Challenge, or Opportunity
New Solutions & Planning
Implement New Solution Evaluation (Assessment, Stabilization, and Continuous
Quality Improvement
1 Due to their social/emotional development, there are a lot of children not entering school in Baltimore City not ready to learn
2. Foster care providers require support to help children with developmental issues and/or challenging behaviors.
3. Due to their trauma, there are a lot of children who do not stay in their foster care placements.
 Establish partnership sites with specific child care providers.
• Weekly visits by social workers
• Observing and assessing children with behavioral issues.
• Creating individualized behavioral plans that will be demonstrated to foster care providers.
• Child progress monitored.
• Referrals for other supports and services are made.
 -Provide consultation to other child care providers as requested.
 -Collect demographic and assessment data.
 -Meet weekly for supervision and support.
 -Provide care providers with training on behavioral and social- emotional development.
 -Establish partnerships with other agencies
 Children who are vulnerable to removal from their home and/or placement will be supported.
 Children’s problematic social- emotional/behavioral issues will improve.
 Foster care providers will establish increased skills in social- emotional and behavioral problems.
 Foster care providers will be equipped with early intervention services and staff.
 Relationships between childcare professionals and families with young children are fostered.
 Children in Baltimore City enter school ready to learn, are healthy, and feel safe, as indicated by a score on a scale.
 A care system for young children is available, infusing mental health services into child care settings.
 Foster care providers are more competent and confident in addressing young children’s behavioral and developmental needs.
 Collaboration amongst professionals interacting with children and families is enhanced.

,
Appendix C: SWOT Analysis

Appendix D: Systems, Roles, and Allies or Adversaries Analysts Chart

Stakeholder, Roles, Allies and Adversaries

Whose support is needed

Readiness

Capacity

Stakeholder

Role

Ally

Adversary

Must actively champion

Has little influence

Is ready to champion

Adamantly opposes

Going along with the majority

Has the skills and argument to be a champion

Target Benefits and Losses Chart

Negative Outcomes
of Not Making the Change

Benefits/Positive Outcomes
of Making the Change

Appendix E: Force Field Analysis Chart

Impact Score

Forces for change

Recommended Change

Forces Against Change

Impact Score

Total

Total

Impact Score
3 High Impact
2 Medium Impact
1 Low Impact
0 No Impact


,

CRBC-FY2021-Annual-Report-Final-V2 – 1 – 1/5/2022 1:15 PM
ANNUAL REPORT
FISCAL 2021
(July 1st 2020 – June 30th 2021)

CRBC-FY2021-Annual-Report-Final-V2 – 2 – 1/5/2022 1:15 PM
Table of Contents
Introduction …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3 By the CRBC State Board Chair FY2021 ………………………………………………….. 3 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… . Executive Summary …………………………………………………………………………………… 4 By the CRBC Administrator FY2021………………………………………………………… 4 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… . Recommendations to DHS for FY2021 …………………………………………………………. 8 Acknowledgements …………………………………………………………………………….. 10 Special Acknowledgements ………………………………………………………………….. 11 SSA Response to CRBC’s FY2020 Annual Report …………………………………….. 12 From SSA Executive Director …………………………………………………………. 12 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… . Program Description ……………………………………………………………………………….. 14 Mission ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15 Vision ……………………………………………………………………………………………….. 15 Goals …………………………………………………………………………………………………. 15 Discrimination …………………………………………………………………………………….. 15 Confidentiality ……………………………………………………………………………………. 15 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… . FY2021 Retention, Recruition, Training and Activities ……..….………………..…..16 FY2021 Legislative Activities………….….………………………………………………….19 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… . FY2021 Out-of-Home Placement Case Reviews ………………………………………….. 20 Targeted Review Criteria ………………………………………………………………………. 20 Case Review Findings by Permanency Plan …………………………………………….. 22 Gender Totals ………………………………………………………………………………………. 22 Ethnicity Overall ………………………………………………………………………………….. 22 Age Range by Permanency Plan …………………………………………………………….. 22 ………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… . FY2021 Case Reviews by Jurisdiction/Permanecy Plan… ……………………….. …..24 Reunification …………………………………………………………………………………….. 25 Non-Relative Adoption ………………………………………………………………………. 33 APPLA ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 42 Relative Placement ……………………………………………………………………………. 51 Non-Relative Custody and Guardianship ………………………………….
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